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Treasure Island (Paperback)

Treasure Island Cover Image
$7.99
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Winter 2009 Kids' List


“Take a look at this magnificent new edition of one of the best adventure stories ever written. John Lawrence's hand-colored, vinyl-cut, and wood-textured illustrations richly evoke the atmosphere and drama of the one of the best adventure stories ever written in this magnificent new edition. An unusually beautiful piece of bookmaking, and a special gift for any time of the year.”
— Carol, Quail Ridge Books, Raleigh, NC

Description


"Fifteen men on the Dead Man's Chest Yo-ho-ho, and a bottle of rum Drink and the devil had done for the rest Yo-ho-ho, and a bottle of rum "

The most popular pirate story ever written in English, featuring one of literature's most beloved "bad guys," Treasure Island has been happily devoured by several generations of boys-and girls-and grownups.

The story is told by Jim Hawkins, a young boy who learns of the whereabouts of a buried treasure from the papers of an old sailor staying at his mother's inn. He shows the treasure map to Dr. Livesey and Squire Trelawney, and the three determine to find it. They fit out a ship, the schooner Hispaniola, hire hands, and set off for Treasure Island. Among the ship's crew are Long John Silver and some of his followers, who are after the treasure for themselves...

The unexpected and complex relationship that develops between Silver and Jim helps transform what seems at first to be a simple, rip-roaring adventure story into a deeply moving study of a boy's growth into manhood, as he learns hard lessons about friendship, loyalty, courage and honor-and the uncertain meaning of good and evil.

About the Author


Robert Louis Stevenson was born in 1850 in Edinburgh. He was an only child and was often ill; as a result, he was much coddled by both his parents and his long-time nurse. The family took frequent trips to southern Europe to escape the cruel Edinburgh winters, trips that, along with his many illnesses, caused Stevenson to miss much of his formal schooling. He entered Edinburgh University in 1867, intending to become an engineer and enter the family business, but he was a desultory, disengaged student and never took a degree. In 1871, Stevenson switched his study to law, a profession which would leave time for his already-budding literary ambitions, and he managed to pass the bar in 1875. Illness put an end to his legal career before it had even started, and Stevenson spent the next few years traveling in Europe and writing travel essays and literary criticism. In 1876, Stevenson fell in love with Fanny Vandergrift Osbourne, a married American woman more than ten years his senior, and returned with her to London, where he published his first fiction, "The Suicide Club." In 1879, Stevenson set sail for America, apparently in response to a telegram from Fanny, who had returned to California in an attempt to reconcile with her husband. Fanny obtained a divorce and the couple married in 1880, eventually returning to Europe, where they lived for the next several years. Stevenson was by this time beset by terrifying lung hemorrhages that would appear without warning and required months of convalescence in a healthy climate. Despite his periodic illnesses and his peripatetic life, Stevenson completed some of his most enduring works during this period: Treasure Island (1883), A Child's Garden of Verses (1885), Kidnapped (1886), and Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde (1886). In 1888, after spending a frigid winter in the Adirondack Mountains, Stevenson chartered a yacht and set sail from California bound for the South Pacific. Though he kept up a vigorous publishing schedule, Stevenson never returned to Europe. He died of a sudden brain hemorrhage on December 3, 1894.
Product Details
ISBN: 9781500475505
ISBN-10: 1500475505
Publisher: Createspace Independent Publishing Platform
Publication Date: July 9th, 2014
Pages: 168
Language: English